Solo Adventures in San Diego (Part Four)

Here is part four of my solo adventures in San Diego.  This was my last day in San Diego and it was the most beautiful.  Before visiting any more museums, I wandered around Balboa Park taking photos of the lovely buildings.  After that, I headed to the Timken Museum of Art.

Day Five

The Timken Museum of Art is similar to the San Diego Museum of Art, except it is smaller and more importantly, free.  It houses European artwork, 19th century American art and artwork from Russian icons.  Also on display is San Diego’s only painting by Rembrandt.  This museum, also know as the “jewel box,” came about thanks to the Timken family and the Putnam sisters, who purchased many of the pieces on display there.  One of the exhibits on display when I visited was “El Lissitzky: Futurist Portfolios,” which featured geometric artwork by a Russian artist.  Unfortunately I was not allowed to take photos at this museum, so you will have to see this one in person.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Solo Adventures in San Diego (Part Three)

Here is part three of my solo adventures in San Diego.  I started off the day by going to a museum just a few blocks from the convention center and then heading over to Balboa Park to visit more of the museums there.

Day Four

My first stop of the day was at the San Diego Chinese Historical Museum.  This museum promotes the history and culture of the original Chinese immigrants.  San Diego’s downtown used to be a Chinatown.  The building that now houses the museum was once the church and school for the local Chinese community.  In the 1990s, this building was slated for demolition but the San Diego Chinese Historical Society was able to save it.  In 1996, it became the museum it is today.  It has expanded throughout the years and now includes two other facilities and a garden behind the original museum.

Continue reading

Solo Adventures in San Diego (Part Two)

Here is part two of my solo adventures in San Diego.  Instead of going to see more museums at Balboa Park, I decided to head over to San Diego Zoo.

Day Three

I hadn’t been to a zoo since I was a teenager in Japan, so I was kind of excited to see the famous San Diego Zoo.  My main goal was to see the Giant Pandas.  This zoo is huge and I walked the entirety of it probably several times but it was worth it.  The day started out with peacocks, flamingos and ducks.  I also got to take a ride on the guided bus tour, allowing me to see where everything was before I started walking around.  I also rode the Skyfari (cable cars that cut across the park) a few times to save my feet.  The view from there is amazing and totally worth the sometimes long wait.  You can see the entire zoo and beyond into Balboa Park.

Continue reading

Solo Adventures in San Diego (Part One)

Back in July of 2014, I got to spend a week in San Diego.  A fellow Long Beach student got a free week long pass to attend the ESRI User Conference (UC).  ESRI UC is held every summer, typically in June or July and at the San Diego Convention Center. This is the biggest conference for Geographic Information Systems (GIS) professionals hosting numerous presentations and vendor displays, all discussing the latest and greatest in GIS.  While I was not able to attend the conference because I didn’t have a pass, I was able to explore San Diego.  I did get to see some of the conference later, thanks to the Family Night event they had.

Day One

My first day in San Diego was mostly spent in the hotel room.  I was rather tired from the journey there.  The drive was about two hours, but since I had to wake up early that day and I’m an anti-morning person, I really had no energy to go out.  The next day though I was ready to take San Diego by storm.

Day Two

On Tuesday, I grabbed my stuff and headed for Balboa Park.  This park is filled with museums!  You could probably spend an entire week just visiting all the museums located within this one place.  Before leaving for this trip, I had spent a few days researching where I wanted to go and more importantly, how to get there.

Continue reading

CG: Honey Garlic Noodles

Our next culinary geography dish is Asian Honey Garlic Noodles and I tend to eat it a lot.  This one, like the previous recipe is adapted from Not Your Average College Food by Emily.  But unlike the previous dish, I did not make a mess of this one.  In fact, I got it right the first time around.  This recipe is easy and quick, so it’s perfect for when you get home and are at that point where you’ll shove food into your mouth by the fistfuls.  Yes, there is a little chopping involved but its only two items and they chop up fast.  I swear.  Just make sure you have a sharp knife.

Honey garlic noodles with roasted potatoes.  Photo by Laylita Day

Honey garlic noodles with roasted potatoes. Photo by Laylita Day

Continue reading

Being in Berlin: A History of the Wall

Last year during the fall semester, I was able to attend a presentation by the very geography professor, who through his class on the human diversity of the U.S convinced me that I should be a geography major.  His presentation, like his lectures was amazing.  Tom Frazier studied abroad in Germany back in the late 1980s and early 90s and thus was able to see the aftermath involving the fall of the Berlin Wall.

His presentation was also part of an art exhibit celebrating the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.  The exhibit featured “Barbara Klemm: Light and Dark,”  displaying 124 black and white photos.  But photos weren’t the only items on display.  Actual pieces of the Berlin Wall were included, courtesy of Frazier, who had picked them up soon after the wall fell.

The presentation was titled, “Deconstructing the Wall, Morphology of the Rise and Fall of the Berlin Wall”. Frazier briefly mentioned the movie “Divided Heaven,” which is a German film that supposedly takes place right before the wall goes up.

Continue reading

Los Angeles Geospatial Summit

Earlier this year I attended the Los Angeles Geospatial Summit.  This event is for those interested or working in the fields of geospatial science, technology and applications.

I arrived during the first session of student papers, thus only catching part of the paper on rooftop community gardens.  The next student paper was by Steve Strand, GIS Analyst for the Orange County Water District.  His paper was about data logging and visualizing data in a 3D format featuring a space-time path while participating in autocross.  Yes, autocross!  The student recorded the driver’s (himself) heart rate and speed while racing.  He used new sensor data, Bluetooth, to generate better location accuracy.  His visualizations were taken from automated table data.

GIS-enabled heart rate data.  Image by Steve Strand.

GIS-enabled heart rate data. Image by Steve Strand.

Next up was the panel on Unmanned Aerial Systems.  Val Vaughn and Mark Vogel discussed “How aerospace is using multi-rotor drones to supplement data needs for image processing R&D”.

Continue reading